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RageQuitters Reviews – ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080

Unboxing and Appearance

 

Asus have kindly supplied us with the ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 in an attractive but not overstated box – no over dramatic characters, logos or dragons to be had here:

ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 box - front

ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 box – front

 

The rear of the box shows the marketing department at their best:

ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 box - rear

ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 box – rear

Onto the card itself then – looking at its belly (when mounted in the case that is), we can see the 3rd generation DirectCU III cooler featuring the exclusive ‘direct-GPU’ contact heat pipes (in layman’s terms, that means the surface which touches the GPU itself is flat, theoretically allowing for better heat conduction) with its patented triple wing blade ‘0 dB’ fan design allowing for 30% cooler operation and x3 quieter performance (though it is not stated if this is v.s. DirectCU II or the reference cooler design). The fan shrouds (not seen lit here), there is RGB lighting which we will discuss in detail later in this article:

ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 - underneath

ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 – underneath

The top of the card features what we believe is mandatory on a high-end card; an attractive back-plate.  Asus have not failed to deliver here – the coverage of the black backplate is complete (only exposing what appears to be the MosFets / power assembly) with an attractive the ‘X’ design etched around the GPU location.  To the right-hand side of the picture, there is a large ‘Republic of Gamers’ logo with RGB lighting which can be fully customised (we’ll show later in this article).  Towards the top is the standard PCI-E connector and, currently capped, two SLI ‘fingers’ towards the bottom left of the picture:

ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 - top and backplate

ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 – top and backplate

For those interested, here is a close-up of the ROG logo:

ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 - ROG logo top

ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 – ROG logo top

 

Unlike the ‘founders edition’ GTX 1080 (which features only a single 8-pin PCI-E power connector), the ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 features a 6-pin + 8-pin PCI-E power configuration, which (combined with the PCI-E lane’s power of 75w) delivers a total of 300w – plenty of power for serious overclocking:

ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 - PCI-E power connectors

ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 – PCI-E power connectors

Moving slightly down, we can see the side ‘Republic of Gamers’ logo in text which is also RGB-lit (they’ve certainly got all the bases covered for you case-modders out there!):

ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 - ROG logo on the side

ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 – ROG logo on the side

Panning out again, this side shot shows more of the DirectCU III cooler’s fin-assembly:

ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 - side 1

ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 – side 1

…and on the other side, you can see the heat-pipe matrix running through the fins:

ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 - side 2

ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 – side 2

Looking at the rear of the card we can see the connectivity comprising of x2 DisplayPort 1.4 connections, x2 HDMI 2.0 ports and a DVI-D connector (note – this card does not feature any form of analogue output):

ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 - rear

ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 – rear

At the other end of the card (the end nearest the front of your case) it is less exciting but you can see the ‘Asus Fanconnect’ headers – a unique feature allowing you to connect two 4-pin GPU-controlled fans instead of plugging them into your motherboard:

ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 - front

ASUS ROG Strix GeForce GTX 1080 – front

3 comments

  1. Buddydudeguy says:

    The HAF-X is ancient. Cases have come a long way over the years and personally I don’t understand why you would even test in a HAF-X.

    • TerminatorUK says:

      Thanks for the comment Buddy.

      I wouldn’t call the HAF-X ‘ancient’ – it is a high-end gaming case from 2011 with excellent airflow and should have plenty of space for most GPUs.

      Unfortunately our budget isn’t endless and we couldn’t just rebuild our test system for the purposes of the review.

      This section in the article was included more of a highlight to check your case as the card’s width extends beyond a ‘standard’ PCI-E card’s regular dimensions; especially with certain motherboards.

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